Eric Wood (Lab PI)  

I am an assistant professor of Ecology in the Biological Sciences Department at Cal State LA. My research is focused on avian ecology and conservation, landscape and urban ecology, and bird migration phenology. I teach Ecology and Evolution, Ornithology, and Ecosystems of California. 

Please see below for further details on graduate and undergraduate students in the lab and be sure to check out the research tabs to learn more about our research themes and ongoing projects.

All photos on this website are my own. If you are interested in using any of my photographs, please ask for my permission before doing so.

Curriculum Vitae download

 

Graduate Students

Sevan Esaian (cv download) Project Title: Tree-species preferences by migratory birds in the Los Angeles urban forest: implications for urban biodiversity conservation. Los Angeles is one of the most biodiverse cities on the planet due to the diverse geography and climates within the region, and the plethora of planted native and non – native vegetation, which is supported by irrigated water. While we have a good understanding of the tree diversity in LA, there remains a lack of understanding regarding the importance of the LA urban forest for conserving biodiversity. I aim to fill this gap by documenting trees that are ‘important’ for sustaining a diverse segment of the southern California wildlife community, migratory birds.  

Sevan Esaian (cv download)

Project Title: Tree-species preferences by migratory birds in the Los Angeles urban forest: implications for urban biodiversity conservation.

Los Angeles is one of the most biodiverse cities on the planet due to the diverse geography and climates within the region, and the plethora of planted native and non – native vegetation, which is supported by irrigated water. While we have a good understanding of the tree diversity in LA, there remains a lack of understanding regarding the importance of the LA urban forest for conserving biodiversity. I aim to fill this gap by documenting trees that are ‘important’ for sustaining a diverse segment of the southern California wildlife community, migratory birds.

 

Heather Mackey (cv download) Project Title: Habitat use of a threatened species: identifying critical habitat for the western Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the Big Bend Region. The National Park Service, along with Mexican Protected Area biologists, have implemented an invasive plant control program to restore native vegetation throughout riparian habitat on over 100 miles of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo in the Big Bend region. One of the main goals of the restoration work is to enhance habitat for numerous vertebrate and invertebrate species that use the riparian habitat throughout the annual cycle. My thesis work will focus on the effect the restoration activities have on breeding western Yellow-billed Cuckoos in Big Bend NP. 

Heather Mackey (cv download)

Project Title: Habitat use of a threatened species: identifying critical habitat for the western Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the Big Bend Region.

The National Park Service, along with Mexican Protected Area biologists, have implemented an invasive plant control program to restore native vegetation throughout riparian habitat on over 100 miles of the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo in the Big Bend region. One of the main goals of the restoration work is to enhance habitat for numerous vertebrate and invertebrate species that use the riparian habitat throughout the annual cycle. My thesis work will focus on the effect the restoration activities have on breeding western Yellow-billed Cuckoos in Big Bend NP. 

Julie Coffey (cv download) Project Title: Avian and lepidopteran community response to invasive species management along the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park. Working on the same restoration project as Heather Mackey, my work is focused on identifying potential drivers of avian and butterfly community structure along the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo in relation to restoration activities. Potential drivers include historic and current land-use patterns, prevalence of native and non-native vegetation, and grazing pressures. A major goal of mine is to provide park biologists with relevant information to guide future restoration activities. 

Julie Coffey (cv download)

Project Title: Avian and lepidopteran community response to invasive species management along the Rio Grande in Big Bend National Park.

Working on the same restoration project as Heather Mackey, my work is focused on identifying potential drivers of avian and butterfly community structure along the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo in relation to restoration activities. Potential drivers include historic and current land-use patterns, prevalence of native and non-native vegetation, and grazing pressures. A major goal of mine is to provide park biologists with relevant information to guide future restoration activities. 

Undergraduate Students

Current

Bryant Luu

Lab alumni

Brenda Nicole Banuleos

Mayra Chicas

Christine King (honor's student)

Ghalib Manjurr

Justin McMichael

Josselin Ortiz